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Exercise 4 - Shadows by BlackSahara Exercise 4 - Shadows by BlackSahara
:wave:

OK, It's time to move on to the next level.
A LOT OF INFO IS COMMING BELOW, SO READ CAREFULLY. :nod:

Shading, or modelling: what is inside the drawing.
A mark on the sheet is already an expression of two dimensions. The artist's task is to increase these to three or more. Shading and it's intensity is a key to this transformation. - - - Michael J. Gelb.


At the top of the image I'm showing my set of pencils. Choosing the right ones is the first thing an artist should do.
I use a set of 12 pencils called "Grand" + one 8B pencil, which is pure graphite without wooden base.
Since the set is my brother's, I think I'm gonna buy one for myself. Grand is really good, but I think I'll search for Faber-Castell pencils, because as far as I remember, I had those in my childhood and they were always considered of high quality.

:bulletblack: A little more on pencils. Basicly, a good pencil should be easily and neatly sharpened. The base should be smooth, not cracking and resulting in an even stroke without scratching. You already should know, or if not - I'm telling you now: B group pencils are softer, used for thicker and richer lines, darker shades. H group pencils are solid, much harder, used for thiner, precise lines, and shading would be quite hard to do with them. HB is a basic, medium soft pencil, found at everyone's home. :) Mostly used for simple drawing and sketching. Numbers show the scale of softness/hardness. The bigger the number, the softer/harder pencil is.

:bulletblack: And having so much different pencils, there is one even more important thing - a good eraser. Here's a few things you should know:
:bulletred:Pencil erasers on the back are the most commonly used, and actually your worst enemies. :police: The erasers on the back of pencils will often smudge the pencil instead of erasing it and make it impossible to be fully erased even by a good eraser.
:bulletred: A lot of pencils have colorful erasers on the end of them (red, green, pink, etc...). Unless you found a very good brand, those will leave a leftover residue from erasing... often the colorful kind... and that can't be removed by anything else, because already stained the paper.
:bulletred: There are a few types of erasers, but I'm not going to write about every of them. I'm using one of "Maped" brand erasers, and I can recommend them. Thay have many to chose from, but I use one, likely the Art Gum type, that is shaving more (which means replacing it more often too), but it erases most of my stuff, even darker lines. Smudges a bit only on a big and dark spots. It's soft , elastic and do not dry, meaning that do not crumble - I have one that was wery useful for precise erasing, but it withered in a month and started crumbling. I'm so highly disappointed of that brand...

OK, NOW THE EXERCISE:
:bulletblue: In the middle of the image you can see the scale of shadow intensity I made. I used only 8B to show how one pencil can express different shades. Different pencils will do different shade intensity and give different textures.
:bulletblue: So, do a scale for yourself. Basicly it should have 4 to 5 ranks.
:bulletblue: Now draw a few spheres. Mark your source of light with a little sun.
:bulletblue: Notice a few very slight lines connecting the sun and the spheres. Those are marking the spots where light do not reach the surface. I recommend drawing those while you're still new at this.
:bulletblue: Start shading the spheres, using your own earlier made scale of intensity.
:bulletblue: Congratulations! You've just stepped into a third dimension.


[link] <<<<<< Exercise 3 ______ Exercise 5 >>>>>> [link]

Tips on drawing >>>>>> [link]
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:icontanixy:
Tanixy Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
But the shades will be so much better if you blend them more ~
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:iconblacksahara:
BlackSahara Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
It's not the point of this exercise. I showed the levels of shading, blending comes after that. Also not every drawing has to be perfectly blended. Some art pieces look better when sharp. :)
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:iconjalessiaj:
JalessiaJ Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2011  Professional Artist
Thanks for the tips!
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:iconcatherinedubois:
CatherineDubois Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
wow, this is really useful! thanks for sharing!
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:iconblacksahara:
BlackSahara Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
You're welcome :)
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:iconmadoldhag:
MadOldHag Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you so much for that one! Hopefully it will help me with that shading thing.

(I only own B and HB pencils, should still work. My rubber isn't too bad I think ... it doesn't smudge too much. If I *want* to smudge I use my fingers ...)
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:iconblacksahara:
BlackSahara Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
:D Yeah... :D Your fingers should look nice after finishing... :D Talkinkg about that, I was thinking of doing one submision with some useful tips, including smudging :)
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:iconmadoldhag:
MadOldHag Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
There can't be enough useful tips. Makes life easier when you don't have to figure out *everything* yourself ...
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